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October 2015

CFP: Cosmopolis and Beyond. Literary Cosmopolitanism after the Republic of Letters. (Trinity college, Oxford, 18-19 March)

Cosmopolitanism, derived from the ancient Greek for ‘world citizenship’, offers a radical alternative to nationalism, asking individuals to imagine themselves as part of a community that goes beyond national and linguistic boundaries.

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Review: Crimson Peak.

*I’m pretty sure I’ve avoided any major spoilers in this review, although there may be one or two very minor plot spoilers which have slipped through the net.**

I’ll be honest – I wasn’t expecting to enjoy Crimson Peak half as much as I did. For one, I’m terrible with scary movies. I’m the asshole in the third row of the cinema who threw their popcorn in the air at the first jumpy bit, and is now sitting with their fingers in their ears, humming loudly to dispel any future frights; and 2) my job consists almost entirely of reading and writing about Victorian gothic fiction. Continue reading “Review: Crimson Peak.”

CFP: ‘Religion and Medicine: Healing the Body and Soul from the Middle Ages to the Modern Day’, Birkbeck, London

Location: Birkbeck, University of London

15th – 16th July 2016

Continue reading “CFP: ‘Religion and Medicine: Healing the Body and Soul from the Middle Ages to the Modern Day’, Birkbeck, London”

CFP: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century

St Anne’s College, Oxford

10th – 11th September 2016

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: CHRISTOPHER HAMLIN AND LAURA OTIS

Continue reading “CFP: Medicine and Modernity in the Long Nineteenth Century”

Ten Supernatural Tales from the Nineteenth Century…just in time for Halloween

With Halloween just around the corner, I thought I’d follow up my Top Ten Neo-Victorian Novels post with a timely dose of spooky stories. I’ve chosen only ones that you can read in a single sitting…in the daytime…with all the lights on. In no particular order, then:

  1. Henry James, ‘The Turn of the Screw’ (1898)

James’s novella is probably the best known and most canonical story on this list, and for good reason. This story practically invented the classic horror trope of the creepy/possessed child. Continue reading “Ten Supernatural Tales from the Nineteenth Century…just in time for Halloween”

CFP: NeMLA 2016 Roundtable “Victorian Popular Fiction in the 21st Century” (9/30/2015; 3/17-20/2016)

Here’s another CFP which might be useful to anyone working in 19th-Century popular cultures or Neo-Victorian studies! Continue reading “CFP: NeMLA 2016 Roundtable “Victorian Popular Fiction in the 21st Century” (9/30/2015; 3/17-20/2016)”

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