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Creative Competition: Substance Use and Abuse in the Long Nineteenth Century

Calling all creative-types, artists, academics, 19thC researchers and Sherlock Holmes fans!

The organizers of the ‘Substance Use and Abuse in the Long Nineteenth Century’ conference (Edge Hill University, September 13th-14th 2018) are inviting submissions of creative works which explore any aspect of nineteenth-century substance use and abuse in one image:

  • Photography, painting, digital art, mixed media, posters?
  • Still lives of drug paraphernalia?
  • Microscopic images of chemical compounds
  • Mapping nineteenth-century drug use?
  • A sculpture featuring Sherlock Holmes’s 243 types of tobacco ash?!

The ‘Substance Use and Abuse in the Long Nineteenth Century’ conference will bring together international, interdisciplinary researchers from Medical Humanities, the History of Medicine, and Romantic/Victorian literature to examine the changing roles of substances for therapy, medication, and recreation in the nineteenth century.

This competition is open to undergraduate and postgraduate students, lecturers and researchers, and members of the public.

Winners will be announced and prizes awarded at the conference, 13th – 14thSeptember 2018 at Edge Hill University.

First prize: £100.

Head Judge: Stephen Whittle. Principle Manager, The Atkinson Southport.

Deadline for entries: 17th August 2018.

For full terms and conditions and to enter, download entry form here and send it, along with your submission, to substance18@edgehill.ac.uk. 

 

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CFP: Science and Spiritualism, 1750-1930

The Leeds Centre for Victorian Studies is pleased to announce a two-day conference, to take place at Leeds Trinity University on 30 and 31 May 2019. We are delighted to have Professor Christine Ferguson (University of Stirling), and Professor Roger Luckhurst (Birkbeck, University of London) as our keynote speakers.

D.D. Home levitates himself in front of witnesses in the home of Ward Cheney in South Manchester, Connecticut on 8 August 1852. From Wikimedia Commons, the free media repository.

Description:
Since the emergence of modern mediumship in the middle of the nineteenth century, science and spiritualism have been interwoven. Sceptics and believers alike have investigated spirit and psychic phenomena to determine its legitimacy. This two-day interdisciplinary conference will explore the history of the intersection of science and spiritualism during the long nineteenth century. Continue reading “CFP: Science and Spiritualism, 1750-1930”

Call for Articles: ‘Materiality in Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries’, Wilkie Collins Journal.

Materiality in Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries
The Wilkie Collins Journal
 Guest Editors: Dr Kym Brindle, Dr Laura Eastlake
‘I prophesy that we shall see ghosts and find treasures, and hear mysterious noises –
and, oh heavens! What clouds of dust we shall have to go through’
(The Dead Secret)
Wilkie Collins’s fiction depicts a rich cabinet of material curiosities. His novels evidence the wealth of objects with which the Victorians surrounded themselves in everyday life. This special issue looks to explore the entanglements between object and subject in Collins’s work. We seek proposals exploring the ways in which aspects of identity in Collins’s novels are articulated through forms of material culture. What is the significance of property and personal possessions for identity formation?

Continue reading “Call for Articles: ‘Materiality in Wilkie Collins and his Contemporaries’, Wilkie Collins Journal.”

CFP: Substance Use and Abuse in the Long Nineteenth Century

Friends, Victorianists… I am delighted to tell you about a conference I’ve been working on with @drBeard79 to be held at Edge Hill University on 13th-14th September 2018. If you are researching any aspect of nineteenth-century substance use (medicine, therapies, foodstuffs, stimulants and sedation, trade) or abuse (addiction, drugs etc) then do submit a paper, or simply come along as an attendee and join us for what is shaping up to be a cracking couple of days, complete with fabulous plenary speakers and some fun surprises to be announced in the coming weeks. If you need some inspiration for your abstract, follow us @substance18_EHU for daily #substance18 Trivia on all manner of substances from the nineteenth century!
Full CFP below – hope to see you there!

CFP: Substance Use and Abuse in the Long Nineteenth Century

13th – 14th September 2018, Edge Hill University

***

Speakers:

Professor Susan Zieger, University of California Riverside

Dr Noelle Plack, Newman University

Dr Douglas Small, University of Glasgow

***

‘The body (follow me closely here) lies at the mercy of the most omnipotent of all potentates—the Chemist.

Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White (1859)

In The Woman in White Collins’s villainous Count Fosco expounds on the power of modern pharmacology. Fosco is speaking at the mid-point of a century wherein the body and the mind seemed increasingly easily affected by the influence of substances. From 1821 opium had allowed Thomas de Quincey to explore ‘the palimpsest of the human mind’ and navigate the dream space of the human subconscious. Ether and chloroform banished pain and facilitated new surgical innovations. Stimulants and sedatives regulated waking and sleeping and the working day in between. Reports of alcoholism, addiction and criminality appeared with increasing regularity in the periodical press and featured in the plots of new literary genres like the sensation novel and the detective story.

This two day interdisciplinary conference examines the changing roles of drugs and chemical substances in the history, literature, and medical discourses of the long nineteenth century. We invite proposals for 15-20 minute papers or panels on any aspect of the theme. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Addiction and excess: Alcohol, tobacco, opiates, cocaine, ether, chloroform and other compounds
  • Psychoactive substances, hallucinogenics, pharmacology
  • New drug treatments, therapies, medical technologies, pain and pain management
  • Concepts of stimulation and sedation
  • Drugs and creativity
  • Drugs and criminality
  • Substances and the media: celebrity culture, advertising,
  • Thomas de Quincey, Coleridge, Keats, Wilkie Collins, L. T. Meade Conan Doyle,
  • Novels, sensation fiction, and literature as addiction
  • Gendered representations of substance use
  • Aphrodisiacs, appetite and their suppressants
  • Substances and the military, empire, trade, war
  • Neo-Romantic or Neo-Victorian representations of substance use

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words together with a brief bio to substance18@edgehill.ac.uk by 21st May.

We are delighted to be able to award a number of postgraduate bursaries. If you would like to be considered for a bursary, please include a 200-word explanation about how the conference relates to your research, along with a breakdown of your expenses.

Please see our website https://substance18.wordpress.com/ for more information.

 

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CFP: ‘Lewis Carroll and George MacDonald: An Influential Friendship’

Saturday, 1 September 2018 

The Sussex Centre for Folklore, Fairy Tales and Fantasy, University of Chichester.

Call for Papers – deadline Friday 30 March 2018

“While Dodgson, the … mathematician who hated inaccuracy, loved to question the very multiplication table’s veracity, my father, the poet, who hated any touch of irreverence, could laugh till tears ran at his friend’s ridicule of smug formalism and copy-book maxims.”

Greville MacDonald, George MacDonald and his Wife, 1924.

The works of the Scottish author, poet and minister George MacDonald and the English polymath Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) have been among the strongest of influences on writers of fantasy for the past 150 years. The relationship between these two Victorians is both deep and fascinating and a close examination of that friendship reveals the significant influence they had on each other’s work.

Continue reading “CFP: ‘Lewis Carroll and George MacDonald: An Influential Friendship’”

CFP: Decadence, Magic(k) and the Occult

Another fantastic Decadence conference for 2018. Submit your papers now!  

CFP: “A Sudden Swift Impression”: Re-Examining the Victorian Short Story

 

A Victorian Popular Fiction Association – Short Story Network Study Day
Hosted by the University of Brighton
Saturday 27th January 2018
Keynote Speaker: Dr Emma Liggins (Manchester Metropolitan University)
on ‘Victorian Women’s Ghost Stories and the Haunted Space: From Elizabeth Gaskell to Margaret Oliphant’
The Victorian Popular Fiction Association and the Short Story Network invite you to submit proposals for this Study Day on the short fiction of the long 19th century.
Scholarship is increasingly recognising the short story as a form that, far from being the inferior relation of the novel, has its own distinctive aesthetic and discursive possibilities. This Study Day will explore the contention that precisely the qualities that led to the short story’s marginal status – its brevity, immediacy, and possible ephemerality – provided writers scope for formal narrative experimentation and for exploring different ways of representing social reality. The conference organisers welcome proposals for 20 minute papers. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • The ghost story and Gothic fiction
  • The short story, crime and detection
  • The short story and humour
  • The short story and romance
  • Imperial short stories
  • Short fiction and the periodicals market
  • The short story and women writers
  • The New Woman
  • Children’s literature / juvenile story papers
  • The short story and sensation
  • The serial short story
  • The short story and science fiction
  • Medicine and the short story
The Study Day will also include a Reading Group (story to be circulated in advance) and the first AGM of the Short Story Network (https://www.facebook.com/shortstoryuk/)
Please submit a 300 word proposal and a 50 word biography to Dr Lucy Andrew and Dr Vicky Margree at shortstorynet@gmail.com by Monday 2nd October, 2017.

CFP: Victorian Popular Fiction Association’s 10th Annual Conference ‘War and Peace’

 
3-7 July 2018, Institute of English Studies, Senate House, London
 
 
Keynote: Mariaconcetta Costantini, G. d’Annunzio University of Chieti-Pescara
 
Keynote: Carolyn Oulton, Canterbury Christ Church University
 
Keynote: Cathy Waters, University of Kent
 
Round Table on the State of the Field:
Juliet John, Andrew King, Julia Kuehn, Kate Newey, Catherine Pope
 
Exhibition: ‘How Novel Was the Novelette? Fiction, Gender and Popular Nineteenth-Century Periodicals’, curated by John Spiers
 
Reading Group: ‘Invasion Fiction’, hosted by Andrew King and Beth Gaskell
 
Call for Papers
The Victorian Popular Fiction Association is dedicated to fostering interest in understudied popular writers, literary genres and other cultural forms, and to facilitating the production of publishable research and academic collaborations amongst scholars of the popular. Our annual conference is now in its tenth year and aims to celebrate with a five day extravaganza! Alongside the usual keynotes, special panels, reading group and exhibition, there will be trips out to different events around London.
The organisers invite a broad, imaginative and interdisciplinary interpretation on the topic of ‘War and Peace’ and its relation to any aspect of Victorian popular literature and culture which might address literal or metaphorical representations of the theme.
We welcome proposals for 20 minute papers, panels of three papers affiliated with an organisation or a group of scholars and non-traditional papers/panels, on topics which can include, but are not limited to:

War:
  • War: colonial wars, war heroes, battles, war poetry, staged battles, invasion and conflict, violent death, war reportage and illustration/photography, war painting, medicine, infirmaries, surgery
  • Material culture of war
  • Britain vs the Continent: conflicts of views, customs, civilizations
  • Us versus Them: Empire and colonialism, ‘otherness’, abject, uncanny
  • Wars of ideas
  • Class war: Chartism, war on poverty, socialism
  • War between the sexes: The New Woman, women as workers and consumers
  •  Science and technology: Darwinism, technological advances, train travel
  • Religious controversies and crises of faith: Darwin, religion vs science, Higher Criticism
  • War is personal: personal rivalries, the threat of crowds and mobs, anarchism, nihilism, terrorism, assassination plots
  • War of mind and body: disease, nervousness, phobias, anxieties
  • Violence: crime and punishment, domestic and sexual abuse, child abuse
  • News and print culture: professional rivalries, periodical debates, book sales, the best seller
  •  Genre wars: realism, sensationalism, Gothic, detective, science fiction
  • Travel writing/writing travel in times of war and conflict
  • Conflict as a narrative force
  • Exclusion of popular fiction from the canon/struggle for recognition in the academy
Peace:
  •  Domestic harmony: love, romance and sex
  • Childhood innocence: the ‘romantic child’ and the Golden Age of children’s literature
  • Anniversaries: birthdays, weddings, christenings, deaths
  • Peace of mind/finding peace: religious movements, beliefs, spirituality/Spiritualism
  • Peace of body: rest cures, convalescing, R.I.P.
  • Social reform: global treaties, armistices, resolution, utopian communities, Pax Britannica, Britain as a guardian of the peace
  • Enforcing the peace: police, legislation, army, suppressing rebellion
  • Design reform movements: Arts and Crafts, the Victorian home, collections and collecting
  • Peace with our neighbours: the Great Exhibition, the grand tour, cosmopolitanism,  relations between countries, food, animals
  • Material culture of peace
  •  News and print culture: literary networks, co-operations, collaborations, authors, publishers and printers, image and text, the development of the book market: triple decker, single volume, yellowback, French novels
  • Narrative and poetic harmony: plot vs. character, poetry vs. prose, the art of the novel
  • Harmony and discord: music in popular fiction
  • Victorian values and nostalgia/costume drama
  • Republication of popular fiction/increasing recognition in the academy
 
Special topic panels: following our successful formula, we are continuing the special panels which will be hosted by guest experts; therefore we especially welcome papers about the following topics:
Topic 1: ‘Class War, Conflict and Reconciliation’ hosted by Tara Macdonald
Topic 2: ‘Religious Controversy and Reconciliation’ hosted by Naomi Heatherington
Topic 3: ‘The First War of Indian Independence’ hosted by Éadaoin Agnew
Please send proposals of no more than 300 words and a 50 word biography in Word format to Drs Janine Hatter, Helena Ifill and Jane Jordan at: vpfainfo@gmail.com
Deadline for proposals: Friday 2nd March 2018

 

CFP: Special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review: The Strand Magazine

Described by Reginald Pound as a ‘national institution’, the Strand Magazine (1891–1950) was the foremost British New Journalistic fiction paper of the 1890s. This heavily illustrated monthly promised its readers ‘cheap, healthful literature’, including short and serial fiction, factual articles, human-interest features and celebrity items, by some of the best-known authors of the time. Yet, in spite of its popularity, the Strand has attracted limited scholarly attention and is often dismissed as a prime example of the Victorian middlebrow. This special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review seeks to elicit original essays assessing the nature, role and significance of the Strand in the period 1891–1918. Possible contributions might address, but are not limited to, topics such as: Continue reading “CFP: Special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review: The Strand Magazine”

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